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‘Changing contours of India’s Soft Power Diplomacy’

  • Category
    India & world
  • Published
    14th Jan, 2020

In recent times, India has unleashed its true potential and maintained a strong focus for its use as an instrument of public diplomacy. The article aims to analyse the increasing importance of soft power and how it has shaped India’s foreign policy and behaviour.

Issue

Context

In recent times, India has unleashed its true potential and maintained a strong focus for its use as an instrument of public diplomacy. The article aims to analyse the increasing importance of soft power and how it has shaped India’s foreign policy and behaviour.

Background:

  • India’s soft power is strong, and it has been so, long before such a concept was made famous by American political scientist Joseph Nye (an American political scientist) in
  • For centuries, India’s soft power was already being recognised in many parts of the world, where people learned about and accessed the arts and culture of one of the world’s oldest civilisations.
  • But the most important time, is the past decade when India has increased its use of soft power in a more systematic way.
  • Several initiatives have been launched to push India to the forefront of the international community, including:
    • the creation of a public diplomacy division within the Ministry of External Affairs in 2006
    • the worldwide expansion of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR)
    • the Ministry of Tourism’s ’Incredible India’ campaign
    • the work of the Ministry for Overseas Indians
    • the promotion of business and trade
    • the current government’s diplomatic efforts
  • These collaborative efforts have not only helped emphasise the social and cultural assets of India abroad, but they also support the country’s major foreign-policy initiatives.
  • In the last few years, the government is focusing on four specific soft power assets of India for achieving diplomatic successes and furthering the country’s national interests:
    • Buddhism
    • Diaspora
    • Yoga
    • economic leverage
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