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“Addition of 3 Endangered Indian Species to the Global Conservation List”

  • Category
    Society
  • Published
    20th Feb, 2020

India has proposed to include three species- the Indian elephant, the Great Indian Bustard and the Bengal Florican in the ‘Appendix I’ of the CMS Convention for ‘migratory species threatened with extinction’.

Context

  • India has proposed to include three species- the Indian elephant, the Great Indian Bustard and the Bengal Florican in the ‘Appendix I’ of the CMS Convention for ‘migratory species threatened with extinction’.

What is the CMS Convention?

  • The Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species (CMS) of Wild Animals (the Bonn Convention) aims to conserve terrestrial, marine and avian migratory species throughout their range.
  • It is an international treaty, concluded under the aegis of the United Nations Environment Programme, concerned with the conservation of wildlife and habitats on a global scale.
  • India became its member in the year 1983.
  • At present, 173 species from around the world have found protection under the Convention by being part of Appendix 1 of the CMS. 

Key-highlights:

  • India is all set to host the Thirteenth Meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP13) to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) in Gandhinagar (February 15 to 22).
  • The theme of the conference is, "migratory species connect the planet and together we welcome them home”.
  • The session is all set to witness the inclusion of ten new species for protection under the CMS.
  • Among the ten species to be added, there are three Indian species, viz., Asian Elephant, Bengal Florican, and the Great Indian Bustard. 
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