What's New :

‘Gender violence drops, but prevalence remains high in bigger states: NFHS-5’

  • Category
    Economy
  • Published
    23rd Dec, 2020

Gender-based violence across most Indian states declined in the past half-a-decade, according to the latest National Family Health Survey (NFHS). However, the prevalence remains high in bigger states.

Context

Gender-based violence across most Indian states declined in the past half-a-decade, according to the latest National Family Health Survey (NFHS). However, the prevalence remains high in bigger states.

About

  • Factsheets for the 22 states surveyed in the first round of NFHS-5 were recently released by the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.
  • The factsheets analyzed domestic violence under three categories: Married women between 18 and 49 years who have ever experienced:
  • Spousal violence (both physical and sexual violence)
  • Physical violence during pregnancy
  • Young women aged between 18 and 29 years who experienced sexual violence by age 18

Key-finding of the Survey

Spousal violence

  • Most states experienced a downward trend in the cases of spousal violence. 
    • Prevalent: The trend, however, was still prevalent (at 35 percent) in Telangana, Manipur, Bihar and Karnataka.
    • Maximum rise: Karnataka, Sikkim and Assam saw the maximum rise in spousal violence in the last five years.
    • Significant hike: Himachal Pradesh and Maharashtra also reported significant hike in prevalence of spousal violence
    • Unchanged: the figures for Jammu and Kashmir remained unchanged
    • Reduction: Manipur, Andhra Pradesh, Sikkim and Meghalaya witnessed a steep reduction in spousal violence
    • Equal prevalence in urban and rural area: Bihar, Kerala and Mizoram reported almost equal prevalence among rural as well as urban areas.

Physical violence during pregnancy

  • 17 of the 22 surveyed states / UTs showed a positive decline in cases of physical violence against women during their pregnancy.
    • Highest fall: Telangana reported the highest fall in such cases followed by Bihar, while Andaman saw the maximum overall decline of three per cent since 2015-16.
    • Maximum rise: The maximum rise in cases was led by three north-eastern states of Meghalaya, Sikkim and Assam followed by Maharashtra.
    • Least violence: Nagaland and Kerala continued to witness the least violence, i.e. the prevalence there was less than 0.5 per cent.
    • Highest percentage: However, despite a huge fall, Karnataka and Telangana had the highest percentage of cases at 5.8 and 4 percent respectively.
    • Unchanged: Goa was the only state that saw no change in its figures in the last five years. 

Sexual violence against young women

  • The data on young women aged between 18 and 29 years who experienced sexual violence by age 18 indicated a mixed trend: As many as nine states and union territories showed a rise in numbers amongst 22 surveyed states.
    • Highest rise: Goa and Maharashtra witnessed the highest rise in cases of 3.3 per cent each.
    • Maximum reduction: Manipur that saw the maximum reduction of 8.6 per cent in the last five years.
    • Unsafe: Karnataka, West Bengal and Bihar were the most unsafe places for girls.
      • High prevalence: Bihar showed a high prevalence of violence despite the alcohol ban imposed in 2015.
    • Least cases: Sexual violence against young women was the least reported in Nagaland, Kerala and Mizoram.
    • Safe rural states: Rural girls were more exposed to violence across a majority of states except Andhra Pradesh, Meghalaya, Sikkim and Nagaland. 

What led to increase in violence (sexual, physical, mental)?

The trend can be attributed to

  • Poverty
  • Unemployment
  • low female literacy rate
  • lower status of women in the state

Unemployment and illiteracy leads to reduced autonomy and say in family decisions by the female members.

X

Verifying, please be patient.

Enquire Now